Press/Reviews

Michael’s Legacy is a wonderful book, a real reach to listen and to know extraordinary karmic webs. What a gift to all of us. Large. Large.

John Wulsin


Michael’s Legacy: Transcending Life and Death
 written by Mark Judelson goes into the life and death of 23-year-old Michael Bovill and how his organs were able to live on in the bodies of five strangers, allowing them a second chance at life. Michael’s last act in this world was to give life to those in need. 

The book discusses so much of what we, at Alexander’s Hope, spread awareness of. This first- hand story details the lives of each of Michael’s recipients, what led them to needing an organ and how they live their lives today. 

Michael’s Legacy dives into the story of Roxanne Watson, who received Michael’s heart. Roxanne now spends most of her days advocating for people to become registered donors. She has signed up countless new donors through her mission. 

One of the most unique aspects of the book is how the author explores the timeline of organ and tissue donations throughout history, including the dates of the first successful transplants. For anyone that is on the cusp as to whether or not to become a donor, this book is for them!

Bella Chaffey
President, Founder of Alexander’s Hope



In Michael’s Legacy, Mark writes with a calm, spare, disciplined authorial voice that he sustains for 250 pages. The style gets out of the way and the story dominates. I know how hard that is. Not a lot of writers can swing it.

Ted Kuster

 

This is truly a book worth reading! It becomes the unforgettable story not only of a remarkable young man and his very real loving family who donated his organs to five people who then were given new life, escaping death. It also tells the individual stories of all of the people who made these transplants possible: the many doctors and nurses and the mothers, fathers, patients’ families who loved and supported the transplant patients. This book is full of dazzling every day heroes. It reminds one of all the love, decency and humanity there is in the world.

Lois Feldman


I had the privilege (I mean that sincerely) of finishing the book two days ago. 

What an extraordinary story! Mark’s book was VERY moving. After I read the first chapter, I think I bent my wife Sue’s ear for 20 minutes or more talking about it because there was so much to say and so many ideas it raised.

Michael and his family are truly remarkable people. (As I re-read this, I see I am writing about Michael in the present tense). How this story crosses social “barriers” (race, religion, socio-economic status, gender, etc.) and demonstrates how artificial those classifications are is something we all need to learn more about. It also raises marvelous questions about what is Death and when do we actually die? And that goes beyond transplantations and extending the physical lives of organ recipients. Because of Michael and his gifts, Scott was able to have children and the reverberations of accomplishments of next generations and the lessons they learn from previous generations that THEY pass on as a result may be immeasurable, perhaps unattributable, yet real. I could go on and on.

Sue and I rechecked our “final instructions” and were reassured that we stated our willingness to be organ donors.  [I understand now that is not the word for some(?) Islamic traditions, but that is the word I have been familiar with.] However, we noticed it is not on our driver’s licenses, so we are going to request new licenses that will instruct first responders to not get rid of our bodies so fast. I also checked to make sure that our cemetery will allow us to be buried if we are an organ or two shy of our full complement. (We will be allowed.)

I believe it should be advertised to the librarians of every medical school in the U.S. and elsewhere. I also believe that professional organizations, like those serving surgeons and ethicists, should be made aware of it as well. The various religious organizational ruling bodies and the organizations dedicated to organ donations should also be included in the outreach so more people can see how remarkable and multi-faceted this issue can be.

A simple and heart-felt congratulations on this good work seems inadequate. I am impressed.

Paul Etkind

 

Michael’s Legacy Cover

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NAACP The Spring Valley NAACP received their Charter on June 25, 1951; and since then has devoted their energy to ensure that civil rights for all members of the community are upheld because it is not a privilege, it is a right. The Branch is known for advocating for voting rights, especially in East Ramapo Central School District, fighting housing discrimination, addressing health issues, challenging the lack of diversity in government and the Police Departments while demanding justice for all.
LiveOnNY LiveOnNY Foundation is the philanthropic arm of LiveOnNY—the federally designated non-profit that oversees organ and tissue donation and transplantation in the greater NY area. Founded in 2016 with seed money from Donate Eight, The Foundation’s core mission is to raise and deploy charitable contributions to support both transplant patients and donor families though their journey and help increase the number of lives saved through public awareness and education.
The Foundation for Human Movement Studies, Inc. (FHMS) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit formed for the purpose of bringing people together to explore the realm of human movement through principles and practices developed by Jaimen McMillian and the Spacial Dynamics Institute that bring increased awareness to human movement and activity. FHMS works to achieve our mission though scholarships and funding for initiatives.